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Frederic Jameson explains about the national allegory and tells us to look at the eastern literature from a new point of view. One can ameliorate their status in society by working very hard but in the story he did it through a fantasy. Jameson relates it to a third world allegory because when we read a story not as a story but an allegory, the sense of the story is lost.
In the story, the central protagonist wants to pursue his dream of becoming a Bollywood actor. His desire to get the free radio is seen as childish and delusional. Well, he is not deluded at all as it can be seen as his imagination which is stemmed from the inside of Ramani due to some defect or short term. It can also be a delusion which is not necessarily autonomous of the social, political, economic circumstances that Ramani is in. It’s the society and its social repressions that is leading to the delusional attribute in Ramani and there is a transcendence. Too much of imagination is a consequence of repression and he’s subverting it. The more that Ramani has been repressed, the more he has to imagine to break the shackles. Eventually there is a sublimation and he comes out of the society. So his dream of going to Bollywood and becoming an actor are not necessarily the same as somebody wanting to compete or excel in life in comparison to someone else. This is the allegorical feature because this does not happen in reality. Manhood is diverse and cannot be censored but society thinks that there is only one or two things which can define a man. This is the censorship which Ramani breaks. In a radio, the antenna is one of the vital thing for it to work and be heard. The channel of reproduction in the male and the female body is similar and losing a mans manhood is like losing the radios antenna and now Ramani is frowned upon, not looked down to be creative and his dream to go to Bollywood is also not seen as noble anymore.