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I can presume that much like myself, everyone has had the misfortune of having a leader that should not have been in the position of leading others. “Leaders are made, they are not born. They are made by hard effort, which is the price which all of us must pay to achieve any goal that is worthwhile.” — Vince Lombardi. I have had the pleasure from personal experience of working with some efficient, and effective leaders vs. an authoritative lazy tyrant in kind words that I will examine in this reflection. Good leaders develop through a never-ending process of self-study, education, training, and experience. Change and growth are abundant it just needs the effort and motivation to sustain it.
At a young age I was taught the value of hard work. Being a daughter of a general contractor, I learned basic skills of how to be effective and efficient. In a profession such as a general contractor you must have discipline, have time management, be able to lead people, and (MGMT 301 Lecture) to get them to have the same goal as you. Not because it’s your goal, “overall shared goal”. As if it was mind control in a way, to think that your making someone do something because they want to do it. I am 23 years old with work experience under my belt. I have experienced management styles that I believe worked great, and others that just fall short in achieving structure.
Over the course of the semester thus far, I am able to further understand how my current manager fails in certain areas of management. Politely speaking, he lacks flexibility dealing with different cultures, he is unsympathetic, he is not a forwarder thinker, and he is a poor communicator. Referring to the quote made by Vince Lombardi “Leaders are made, they are not born”, I believe this to be true. Now a days one is not able to adopt the particular management styles and be able to use it when dealing with different types of employees. It is a hard thing, having to go to work every day and deal with a manager that has a “my way, or the highway” type of mentality. However, there is a lesson in everything we experience. If able to recommend a change to this issue of his management style; is not to only support his employees, but he should be flexible when it comes to learning from them and their culture. Every person brings a different skill set to a position, a different outlook that is based on their own personal experiences in life.
I myself am a visual learner. I along with a handful of my co-workers were recently criticized in front clients for not understanding text documents of how to work the new scheduling system. I find it easier to be shown step by step on a computer, which allows me to learn faster. Yet in that situation I was more than willing to learn in the fashion assigned to me. His temperament, or interpersonal skills are flawed. Leadership is expressed in your decisions, about motivating, and disciplining people. If able to recommend a change to this issue of his management is a current reality assessment could suffice. Allowing him to look at where the organization under his management stands and see what is working and what could be different so as to maximize efficient and effectiveness in achieving the set tasks.
To learn from your employees one must be a good communicator. The ability to effectively communicate with others is an imperative management skill. If a manager cannot communicate his ideas and plans to employees in a clear and concise way, he is destined to fail in that role. My current manager is vague on feedback when asked a question of how to improve or be more efficient in my position. He will address a concern, then a half hour later contradict a prior order given. Leadership is about direction, guidance, and support. All of these elements require the ability to communicate well as a prerequisite. Simply asking if everyone understands the direction given I believe would be a great start. Recommending that he communicates in a non-defensive approach that is assertive, direct and powerful.
Lastly referring back to my manager. Approaching this business environment in a way he has managed another I have clarified simply won’t work. Innovation, the best leaders constantly brainstorm new innovated ideas, and keep in mind of the future. I believe that my current manager needs a vision of what is the next step in “our shared” goal is. I myself try to continually think of ways to be more efficient whether it’s in my studies, or tasks at hand. I want to continue to work for this company. I want to work in a positive environment that begins with the idea of well-being. Working for an exceptional company, then to start at my current job has myself having many passive feelings. According to psychologist Martin Seligman, “Well-being is the combined compact of five elements- positive emotions, engagement, relationships, meaning, and achievement” (PERMA). Seligman address the issue that we must pursue these elements for their own sake, not as a means to achieve another outcome.
I am optimistic this organizations environment will change, I will voice my opinion in the appropriate setting. Refusing to give up isn’t an opinion because the environment is not ideal. I try to look at this business as an outsider looking in, to not be passive, and come to work with an open mind. I am learning what not to do, but also learning how to confront difficult management styles. I am aware this will not be the last of my bad leadership incounter. Reflecting on what you as an employee can accomplish to become a leader for yourself as well as other co-workers can build a bridge and identify a “shared” motivation that for our manager shares with us. Of course, to do our job well is one, but to discover how to reverse the role and be the mind controller. Understanding why your boss does or cares about certain things can give you an insight into his or her management style to be able to adapt and innovate together. In an ideal world, we would all have fantastic managers who help us succeed, who made us feel valued, and who were just all-around great people. Unfortunately, that’s not always the case. But, whether the person you work for is a micromanager, has anger management problems, shows favoritism toward one person, or just isn’t very competent, you still have to make the best of the situation and get your job done. An open un-bias mind can