Why Does The Poet Compare The Daffodils To Stars?

What is being compared to the stars?

Solution.

The host of golden daffodils by the side of the lake under the tree are being compared to the stars.

Similarly like the stars in the milky way the poet feels that the daffodils are not only uncountable but also they are dancing with full energy and joy in never ending line along the margin of the lake ..

What is the main idea of I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud?

The main theme of the poem “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” by William Wordsworth is that of bliss, or a certain state of natural happiness.

Why does the poet stop on seeing the daffodils?

Why does the poet stop on seeing the daffodils ? Answer: The poet stops on seeing the daffodils because never before in his life had he seen such beautiful golden daffodils and that too in such a very large number. He is completely attracted towards them.

Why has the poet describe solitude as being blissful?

The poet has described solitude as being blissful because when the poet used to lie in a vacant or in a pensive mood, he recalls the daffodils which give him immense pleasure and makes his heart and soul fill with joy once again.

What does the poet say about the number of flowers?

Answer. Answer: The poet says that flowers are endless with their magnificent beauty all around like a magical world.

Where do the stars shine?

Stars shine because they are extremely hot (which is why fire gives off light — because it is hot). The source of their energy is nuclear reactions going on deep inside the stars. In most stars, like our sun, hydrogen is being converted into helium, a process which gives off energy that heats the star.

What does the poet compare with?

he compares fire by desire , anger ,devastation. Answer:The poet compared the ‘fire’ in this poem with desire. Because, fire is something that burn everything. However it can be control, but desire can’t be controlled.

What do the daffodils represent in the poem?

That is, everything that the daffodils represent—joy, playfulness, survival, beauty—”fills” the speaker with “bliss” and “pleasure.” In the speaker’s mind, the speaker is again dancing “with the daffodils.” The poem, then, is arguing that communion with nature is not just a momentary joy, but something deeper and long- …

What is the theme of this poem?

Theme is the lesson about life or statement about human nature that the poem expresses. To determine theme, start by figuring out the main idea. Then keep looking around the poem for details such as the structure, sounds, word choice, and any poetic devices.

What made the poet happy?

Answer. Answer: Answer: Whenever the poet lies on his couch in a free or sad mood, the beautiful scene of daffodils seen by him earlier flashes across his mind. … Then the memory of the beautiful scene makes the poet become happy again.

What do poets compare daffodils with?

(a) Why does the poet compare the daffodils to the stars? Ans:- The daffodils resemble akin to innumerable shining stars that one could see in the night sky in the form of Milky Way. That is why the poet compares the daffodils to the stars.

What resemblance does the poet find between the stars and the daffodils?

Answer. Answer: The poet finds great resemblance between the stars and the daffodils. The flowers were as countless as the stars in the milky way in the sky.

What wealth does the poet gain from the daffodils?

the wealth which is referred to here by the poet means wealth of joy and happiness;which actually comes from happy and fond memories when the poet saw a host of golden daffodils by the side of the lake beneath the trees.

What happens to the poet when he lies on his couch?

According to the poem, when the poet when he lies on his couch in a blank or thoughtful mood, the beautiful memory of the golden daffodils flashes in his mind. This memory brings him immense happiness and fills his heart with aesthetic pleasure. … And dances with the daffodils. ‘

What did the poet compare himself to and why?

Answer: The poet compares himself to a cloud in the beginning of the poem because he is wandering about in a state of loneliness and detachment. Just like the clouds are moving overhead unattached to the scene below similarly the poet is walking all alone detached from the scenes of nature that surround him.

Why has the poet called the daffodils Golden?

Answer. The poet William Wordsworth refers to the daffodils as golden because of two reasons one of which is very reasonable and the other one is metaphorical. As the colour of the flowers is yellow, the poet calls them golden. … For him, the view of the daffodils dancing sprightly is as dear as gold.

What does the poet compare himself to?

Solution. Wordsworth is comparing himself to a cloud in the sky, wandering without a destination, as can be seen in Line 1 of the poem “I wandered lonely as a cloud”. … Being lonely like a floating cloud in the sky, the poet experiences freedom and loneliness at the same time.

What is the main theme of the poem Daffodils?

The most prevalent themes in this poem are overcoming feelings of sadness and the beauty of nature. It is thanks to the beauty of a field of daffodils that the poet happens upon that he is able to leave his feelings of melancholy behind.

What is the central idea of the poem?

The central idea of a poem is the poem’s theme or ‘what it’s about’ if you like. Although many shy away from poems being ‘about’ something, at the end of the day, the poet had something in mind when it was written, and that something is the central idea, whatever it is or might have been.

What kind of poem is daffodils?

And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils. “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” (also commonly known as “Daffodils”) is a lyric poem by William Wordsworth.

Why did the daffodils make him think of stars?

The poet compares daffodils to the stars in the galaxy because they were stretched in straight line and appeared just like stars in the sky. The daffodils were golden in color, and their waving in the breeze seemed like the stars were shining and twinkling. These similarities have urged the poet to compare them.